A red squirrel treasure hunt

…berries, fungi, plant shoots— even bird eggs. Cones are a particularly important source of food. If you’ve every picked one up that looks like it’s been through a shredder, it could very well be the remains of a red squirrel’s lunch. © Elana Bader However, squirrels aren’t the only animals that strip cones for their seeds. Other rodents such as… […]

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Gardening for red squirrels

…plastic turf? Then you’ll understand that it’s never been more important to create safe havens for wildlife in our urban and suburban environments. Fortunately, while some people continue to push out nature in favour of cars and convenience, others are making space in their lives for a bit of wildness. Thanks to increased awareness in recent years we’re leaving gaps… […]

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Grey squirrel control: connecting the dots

…the spread of grey squirrels. Classified as an invasive non-native species, it is widely acknowledged that targeted, landscape-scale grey squirrel population control is essential if we want to reverse the decline of Scotland’s red squirrels. It’s a huge undertaking, but fortunately there are many passionate and experienced landowners and individuals volunteering to do their bit across priority areas. At Saving… […]

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News: Great Scottish Squirrel Survey launched to boost protection for native reds

…something a bit different. By going out and looking for squirrels during the Great Scottish Squirrel Survey people can help us create a more detailed snapshot of the current situation on the ground.” Autumn is an ideal time of year for squirrel-watching. With leaves falling they can be easier to spot as they move through the treetops, foraging for the… […]

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SNOW DAY!

…to make my own evidence for squirrel presence at my home. I made a 1.5 metre snow squirrel, which you can see here. It only took me 45 minutes and only required snow, gloves, and a stick to hold the three main body parts together in the slanting position. I may be suffering from a little bit of cabin-fever, but… […]

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New Frontiers for Volunteers

…a disease spread by fleas and brought from Europe. So there’s fair bit of somewhat unexpected symmetry between my work in New Mexico and what I’m getting into here in Scotland volunteering with SSRS. It’s a fantastic opportunity to be involved in this project and it’ll be really exciting to finally get this field season underway. My hope is that… […]

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This Year's Sightings